Things I Like
Things I Like
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wonderous-world:

Sunset Brooklyn Bridge
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rhamphotheca:

First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea Anglerfish
by Dana Lacono (August, 2012)
With a bulbous body and spiky scales, a shaggy lure dangling from its head, and foot-like fins that it uses to “walk” along the seafloor, the deep-sea anglerfish Chaunacops coloratus looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book.
In a recent paper, MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten and his coauthors describe the first observations of these rare fish in their natural, deep-sea habitat. In addition to documenting these fish walking on the seafloor and fishing with their built-in lures, the researchers discovered that the fish change color from blue to red as they get older.
C. coloratus was first described from a single specimen collected off the coast of Panama during an expedition in 1891 aboard the U.S. Fish Commission steamer Albatross. However, for over 100 years, marine researchers collected deep-sea fish using trawl nets and dredges, so this anglerfish was never seen alive. That changed in 2002, when researchers from MBARI, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary used the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Tiburon to explore Davidson Seamount—an extinct volcano off the coast of Central California…
(read more: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)
rhamphotheca:

First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea Anglerfish
by Dana Lacono (August, 2012)
With a bulbous body and spiky scales, a shaggy lure dangling from its head, and foot-like fins that it uses to “walk” along the seafloor, the deep-sea anglerfish Chaunacops coloratus looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book.
In a recent paper, MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten and his coauthors describe the first observations of these rare fish in their natural, deep-sea habitat. In addition to documenting these fish walking on the seafloor and fishing with their built-in lures, the researchers discovered that the fish change color from blue to red as they get older.
C. coloratus was first described from a single specimen collected off the coast of Panama during an expedition in 1891 aboard the U.S. Fish Commission steamer Albatross. However, for over 100 years, marine researchers collected deep-sea fish using trawl nets and dredges, so this anglerfish was never seen alive. That changed in 2002, when researchers from MBARI, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary used the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Tiburon to explore Davidson Seamount—an extinct volcano off the coast of Central California…
(read more: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)
rhamphotheca:

First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea Anglerfish
by Dana Lacono (August, 2012)
With a bulbous body and spiky scales, a shaggy lure dangling from its head, and foot-like fins that it uses to “walk” along the seafloor, the deep-sea anglerfish Chaunacops coloratus looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book.
In a recent paper, MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten and his coauthors describe the first observations of these rare fish in their natural, deep-sea habitat. In addition to documenting these fish walking on the seafloor and fishing with their built-in lures, the researchers discovered that the fish change color from blue to red as they get older.
C. coloratus was first described from a single specimen collected off the coast of Panama during an expedition in 1891 aboard the U.S. Fish Commission steamer Albatross. However, for over 100 years, marine researchers collected deep-sea fish using trawl nets and dredges, so this anglerfish was never seen alive. That changed in 2002, when researchers from MBARI, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary used the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Tiburon to explore Davidson Seamount—an extinct volcano off the coast of Central California…
(read more: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)
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ifuckingloveminerals:

Vanadinite, Galena, Quartz
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xysciences:

Meteor striking through the Aurora Borealis. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs] 
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txchnologist:


RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born
by Michael Keller
Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 
By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.
“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”
Read more and check out the video below.
Read More
txchnologist:


RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born
by Michael Keller
Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 
By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.
“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”
Read more and check out the video below.
Read More
txchnologist:


RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born
by Michael Keller
Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 
By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.
“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”
Read more and check out the video below.
Read More
txchnologist:


RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born
by Michael Keller
Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 
By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.
“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”
Read more and check out the video below.
Read More
txchnologist:


RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born
by Michael Keller
Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 
By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.
“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”
Read more and check out the video below.
Read More
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the-wolf-and-moon:

The Great Orion Nebula
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xysciences:

Magnetic putty eating a piece of metal. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]
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mstrkrftz:

Milky way shining brightly above Rinjani Mountain, Lombok, Indonesia
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amnhnyc:

This spider was trapped in tree resin about 20 million years ago. Over time, the resin fossilized to amber, preserving the animal inside. Specimens like this are helpful given that spiders don’t fossilize well in sediment. They offer researchers good information about the group’s more recent history. The oldest known amber specimen is from around 130 million years ago. This specimen was collected in the Dominican Republic. 
Learn more in our exhibition, Spiders Alive! open now. 
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xysciences:

Coral branches retreating to protect themselves.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]